Richard Findlay's Gallery of Photographs with a Scottish Twist
Welcome to FotoFling Scotland's Gallery
Fotos with a Scottish Twist

Edinburgh Castle from Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh


Welcome to FotoFling Scotland and share Richard Findlay's passion for photography featuring Scotland’s people, mountains, lochs and glens, and events with a Scottish flavour.


Click on the various folders of galleries or search a keyword to view images and click further to enlarge or use slideshow facility


Many photos maybe purchased/licensed and Richard is also available for commissions - paid or without fee depending on the nature of the project - about me


Fotos with a Scottish Twist




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  • Duart Castle, Mull

    The castle dates back to the 13th century and is the seat of Clan MacLean. In 1350 Lachlan Lubanach Maclean of Duart, the 5th Clan Chief, married Mary, daughter of John of Islay, Lord of the Isles and she was given Duart as her dowry. In 1647, Duart Castle was attacked and laid siege to by the Argyll government troops of Clan Campbell, but they were defeated and driven off by the Royalist troops of Clan MacLean. In September 1653, a Cromwellian task force of six ships anchored off the castle, but the Macleans had already fled to Tiree. A storm blew up on the 13 September and three ships were lost, including HMS Swan. In 1678, Archibald Campbell, 9th Earl of Argyll, son of the Marquess of Argyll, successfully invaded the Clan MacLean lands on the Isle of Mull and Sir John Maclean, 4th Baronet fled the castle and withdrew to Cairnbulg Castle, and afterward to Kintail under the protection of the Earl of Seaforth. In 1691 Duart Castle was surrendered by Sir John Maclean, 4th Baronet to Archibald Campbell, 1st Duke of Argyll. The Campbell clan demolished the castle, and the stones from the walls were scattered. Donald Maclean, 5th Laird of Torloisk used some of the stones to build a cottage for his family close to the site of the castle. By 1751 the remains of the castle were abandoned. Descendants of Archibald Campbell, 1st Duke of Argyll sold the castle in 1801, to MacQuarrie, who then sold it to Carter-Campbell of Possil who kept it as a ruin within the grounds of his own estate to the north, Torosay Castle. He later sold his Torosay Estate which now included the ruins of Castle Duart to A. C. Guthrie in 1865. On 11 September 1911, the ruin was separated from the rest of the Torosay Estate and was bought by Sir Fitzroy Donald Maclean, the 26th Chief of the Clan MacLean and restored. Film Location: The castle was used as a location in the 1999 film Entrapment, starring Sean Connery (who has MacLean ancestry on his mother's side) and Catherine Zeta-Jones. The castle also features prominently in the 1971 film When Eight Bells Toll, starring Anthony Hopkins.

  • Oban

     

  • The Scottish Experience

    Royal Mile, Edinburgh

  • Cortado

    "Edinburgh's newest and best Coffee Shop on the Mile! Specializing in Scottish and Spanish drinks and food as well as original art and gifts."

  • Sporran Makers and Repairers

    Wm. E. Scott & Son - Causewayside Edinburgh

  • Royal Court Stage Door

    Royal Court Theatre, Liverpool built in 1938 in an Art Deco style.

  • Victoria Tower, Liverpool

    Victoria Tower is a Grade II listed Gothic Revival clock tower located alongside Salisbury Dock in Liverpool, England. Victoria Tower was designed by Jesse Hartley and was constructed between 1847 and 1848, to commemorate the opening of Salisbury Dock. Its design was based upon an earlier drawing by Philip Hardwick in 1846. Victoria Tower, which was often referred to as the 'docker's clock', was built as an aid to ships in the port, as it allowed them to set the correct time as they sailed out into the Irish Sea, while its bell warned of impending meteorological changes such as high tide and fog. Upon its completion is also served as a flat for the Pier Master.

  • O2 Academy

    The O2 Academy Liverpool (formerly the Carling Academy Liverpool) is a music venue in Hotham Street, Liverpool, England, that is run by the Academy Music Group. The main building consists of performance areas. O2 Academy1 can hold 1,200 (900 floor/300 balcony) people while O2 Academy2 can hold 500. There are also 5 bars in the building which cater for the visitors who come to see shows (2 in O2 Academy2 and 3 in O2Academy1. On 6 November 2008, it was announced that Telefónica Europe (owners of the O2 Network in the UK) had become the new sponsor of all Academy venues, in a deal with music promoter Live Nation. The deal, which lasts for five years, sees all venues rebranded "The O2 Academy", in line with Telefónica's purchase of the Millennium Dome (now The O2). On 20 December 2010,Sir Paul McCartney got back to where he once belonged, performing a homecoming show at Liverpool's O2 Academy for the very first time. Fans were treated to tea, coffee and Chips from a van outside the venue as they eagerly waited to enter.

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  • Moncrieff Inscription

    Moncrieff Inscription in Falkland in Fife, Scotland. This inscription is on the wall of a house in the High Street opposite to the Palace. It reads, " All praise to God, thanks to the most excellent monarch of Great Britaine, of whose princelie liberalities this is my portione. Deo Laus. Esto fidus. Adest Merces. Nichol Moncrieff, 1610."

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  • Let the rehearsal begin !

    First day of rehearsals for David Hughes Dance Scotland's autumn tour of Scotland, Switzerland & Germany - shot at DanceBase, Grassmarket, Edinburgh

  • Memorial to the Moorfoot Pit Disaster (1883)

    An explosion at the Altham Colliery (later named Moorfield) Lancashire resulted in the deaths of 68 Men and boys on 7th November 1883 (including my Great Grandfather, James Osbaldeston (aged 37) and his son Great Uncle, Richard (aged 11). James died instantly but Richard died a few days later as a result of burns. My Great Grandmother Sarah was left without any means of support to bring up my Grandmother and her sister in Clayton Le Moors, Lancashire.

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  • Kilting in Edinburgh

    Edinburgh Walkabout

  • Church of Our Lady and Saint Nicholas, Liverpool

    The Church of Our Lady and Saint Nicholas is the Anglican parish church of Liverpool. The site is said to have been a place of worship since at least 1257. The church is situated close to the River Mersey near the Pier Head. The Chapel of St Nicholas (Patron Saint of Sailors) was built on the site of St Mary del Quay, which in 1355 was determined to be too small for the growing borough of Liverpool. It is designated by English Heritage as a Grade II listed building,and is an active parish church in the diocese of Liverpool, the archdeaconry of Liverpool and the deanery of Liverpool North. Note the gilded copper weather vane in the form of the ship is on top of the tower of St Nicholas added to the church in 1746.

  • Edward VII Statue, Liverpool

    Strategically sited in the middle of the central axis between the Cunard Building and the river is the majestically dominant, 4.9 metres high, bronze equestrian statue of King Edward VII by Sir William Goscombe John. The statue was commissioned following the death in 1910 of the king and was originally intended to be located outside the south entrance to St. George's Hall. However, after much wrangling it was decided that it should be placed in its current location and almost 11 years after being commissioned, the sculpture was unveiled in 1921 in a ceremony lasting 10 minutes

  • Royal Liver Building

    The Royal Liver Building is located in Liverpool and is sited at the Pier Head and along with the neighbouring Cunard Building and Port of Liverpool Building is one of Liverpool's Three Graces, which line the city's waterfront. It is also part of Liverpool's UNESCO designated World Heritage Maritime Mercantile City. Opened in 1911, the building is the purpose-built home of the Royal Liver Assurance group, which had been set up in the city in 1850 to provide locals with assistance related to losing a wage-earning relative. One of the first buildings in the world to be built using reinforced concrete, the Royal Liver Building stands at 90 m (300 ft) tall. It was the tallest storied building in Europe from completion until 1932 and the tallest in the United Kingdom until 1961. The Royal Liver Building is now however only the joint-fourth tallest structure in the City of Liverpool, having been overtaken in height by West Tower, Radio City Tower and Liverpool Cathedral. Today the Royal Liver Building is one of the most recognisable landmarks in the city of Liverpool and is home to two fabled Liver Birds that watch over the city and the sea. Legend has it that were these two birds to fly away, then the city would cease to exist.

  • Royal Liver Building

    The Royal Liver Building is located in Liverpool and is sited at the Pier Head and along with the neighbouring Cunard Building and Port of Liverpool Building is one of Liverpool's Three Graces, which line the city's waterfront. It is also part of Liverpool's UNESCO designated World Heritage Maritime Mercantile City. Opened in 1911, the building is the purpose-built home of the Royal Liver Assurance group, which had been set up in the city in 1850 to provide locals with assistance related to losing a wage-earning relative. One of the first buildings in the world to be built using reinforced concrete, the Royal Liver Building stands at 90 m (300 ft) tall. It was the tallest storied building in Europe from completion until 1932 and the tallest in the United Kingdom until 1961. The Royal Liver Building is now however only the joint-fourth tallest structure in the City of Liverpool, having been overtaken in height by West Tower, Radio City Tower and Liverpool Cathedral. Today the Royal Liver Building is one of the most recognisable landmarks in the city of Liverpool and is home to two fabled Liver Birds that watch over the city and the sea. Legend has it that were these two birds to fly away, then the city would cease to exist.

  • Edward VII Statue, Liverpool

    Strategically sited in the middle of the central axis between the Cunard Building and the river is the majestically dominant, 4.9 metres high, bronze equestrian statue of King Edward VII by Sir William Goscombe John. The statue was commissioned following the death in 1910 of the king and was originally intended to be located outside the south entrance to St. George's Hall. However, after much wrangling it was decided that it should be placed in its current location and almost 11 years after being commissioned, the sculpture was unveiled in 1921 in a ceremony lasting 10 minutes

  • Dock Traffic Office

    The Traffic Office, with its unusual cast iron portico, is one of a number of building designs by Hartley in collaboration with the architect Philip Hardwick. The original design was by Hardwick, but Hartley radically changed it by adding a second floor to it shortly after its construction. Both inside (where the 'light well' became an impressive hall) and outside, it was designed to impress and, like others of Hartley's lesser buildings, could be considered part of a 'corporate identity'. It is built of brick with red sandstone dressings. There are prominent battered chimney stacks with connecting arches. The most remarkable feature is the cast iron Tuscan portico and frieze. The four columns are 3.5m high, have a diameter of 1m at the base, and were cast in two halves and brazed together along their length. The architrave is 11.5m long and was made in a single casting, in the shape of a giant "U". Brazed onto the architrave is an iron cornice and pediment, consisting of seven separate castings. The building suffered prolonged dereliction, including structural damage, before being restored under the aegis of the Merseyside Development Corporation and re-opened as television studios.

  • The Philharmonic Dining Rooms

    The Philharmonic Dining Rooms is a public house at the corner of Hope Street and Hardman Street in Liverpool, Merseyside, England, and stands diagonally opposite the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall. It is commonly known as The Phil. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II* listed building. The public house was built in about 1898–1900 for the brewer Robert Cain. It was designed by Walter W. Thomas (not to be confused with Walter Aubrey Thomas the designer of the Royal Liver Building) and craftsmen from the School of Architecture and Applied Arts at University College (now the University of Liverpool), supervised by G. Hall Neale and Arthur Stratton. The interior is decorated in musical themes that relate to the nearby concert hall. These decorations are executed on repoussé copper panels designed by Bare and by Thomas Huson, plasterwork by C. J. Allen, mosaics, and items in mahogany and glass. Two of the smaller rooms are entitled Brahms and Liszt Of particular interest to visitors is the high quality of the gentlemen's urinals, constructed in "a particularly attractive roseate marble".

  • The Philharmonic Dining Rooms

    The Philharmonic Dining Rooms is a public house at the corner of Hope Street and Hardman Street in Liverpool, Merseyside, England, and stands diagonally opposite the Liverpool Philharmonic Hall. It is commonly known as The Phil. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II* listed building. The public house was built in about 1898–1900 for the brewer Robert Cain. It was designed by Walter W. Thomas (not to be confused with Walter Aubrey Thomas the designer of the Royal Liver Building) and craftsmen from the School of Architecture and Applied Arts at University College (now the University of Liverpool), supervised by G. Hall Neale and Arthur Stratton. The interior is decorated in musical themes that relate to the nearby concert hall. These decorations are executed on repoussé copper panels designed by Bare and by Thomas Huson, plasterwork by C. J. Allen, mosaics, and items in mahogany and glass. Two of the smaller rooms are entitled Brahms and Liszt Of particular interest to visitors is the high quality of the gentlemen's urinals, constructed in "a particularly attractive roseate marble".

  • Gents Urinals - The Philharmonic Dining Rooms

    Of particular interest to visitors is the high quality of the gentlemen's urinals, constructed in "a particularly attractive roseate marble".

  • The Guildhall, High Street, Newcastle under Lyme

    "The dignified, red brick and stone Guildhall in the High Street has presided over the busy market-place for more than 200 years and provides a fitting expression of the growth of Newcastle. In the 12th century, when Newcastle was beginning to establish itself as an important trading centre, the High Street would have been one big marketplace, covered with stalls on market days. The market prospered, and in 1235 the King recognised its importance by granting the townsmen the right to form a Guild, which quickly became the real authority in the town. Later, craft guilds came into existence, and these included journeymen and apprentices as well as employers. Members of craft guilds were skilled practitioners of a variety of trades, and by the 14th century they had taken control of local government, ousting the guild merchants. In the 16th century the guilds were gradually superseded by a new administration which continued to call its meeting place a Guildhall rather than a Town Hall. This building eventually became unsuitable and the present Guildhall was built on an adjacent site shortly after 1713. The clock tower was added later, as the inscription over the portico proclaims: This clock was presented to the town by James Astley Hall, J.P., Esq., MDCCCLXI (1861). In the rapidly expanding borough this building, too, became obsolete, and local government was transferred to the much larger and elaborate Municipal Hall following its completion in 1890." Neville Malkin 14th May 1975

  • Victoria Statue in Queen's Gardens, Newcastle Under Lyme

    Statue of Queen Victoria. 1903 sculpted by C.B. Birch, in bronze. The statue was originally erected in Nelson Place and unveiled on 5th November 1903 by the Grand Duke Michael of Russia to celebrate the coronation of Edward VII (August 1902). It was given to the town by Sir Alfred Haslam, then mayor of the town, who also presented similar statues to London (on Blackfriars Bridge) and Derby (in grounds of Royal Infirmary), both of which are listed at Grade II. These are three of a number of identical statues to C.B.Birch's design; others are to be found in Scarborough and Aberdeen as well as Adelaide, Australia. This statue was moved to Station Walk in 1963, and then moved again in 2001 to its present position near to the original location.

  • Victoria Statue in Queen's Gardens, Newcastle Under Lyme

    Statue of Queen Victoria. 1903 sculpted by C.B. Birch, in bronze. The statue was originally erected in Nelson Place and unveiled on 5th November 1903 by the Grand Duke Michael of Russia to celebrate the coronation of Edward VII (August 1902). It was given to the town by Sir Alfred Haslam, then mayor of the town, who also presented similar statues to London (on Blackfriars Bridge) and Derby (in grounds of Royal Infirmary), both of which are listed at Grade II. These are three of a number of identical statues to C.B.Birch's design; others are to be found in Scarborough and Aberdeen as well as Adelaide, Australia. This statue was moved to Station Walk in 1963, and then moved again in 2001 to its present position near to the original location.


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