Richard Findlay's Gallery of Photographs with a Scottish Twist
Welcome to FotoFling Scotland's Gallery
Fotos with a Scottish Twist

Edinburgh Castle from Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh


FotoFling Scotland is Richard Findlay's gallery of photographs featuring the mountains, loch and glens of Scotland and captures of people and events with a Scottish flavour.

Richard Findlay is by profession an entertainment lawyer and biz affairs consultant based in Edinburgh who has a passion for photography.He been engaged to shoot music gigs, dance events, theatre shows, gala events, highland games, sporting events and civil partnership ceremonies. In addition many have had their social networking profiles enhanced by the benefit of his creativity and lived to tell the tale!



Featured Photo Galleries

Today's Uploads & Recent Photos

  • Ticket Stub "My Fair Lady" 1966

    70mm Roadshow Presentation of 'My Fair Lady' at Palladium Cinema, South Shore, Blackpool in 1966

  • Kimberley Hotel, Blackpool

    Early '60's postcard of Kimberley Hotel, South Promenade, Blackpool

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  • Caber Toss

    Cowal Gathering 2013

  • Camera Envy

    Cowal Gathering 2013

  • Drew Griffiths & Frazer Hirsch

    Cowal Gathering 2013

  • Liam Mcgunnagle & Frazer Hisch

    Cowal Gathering 2013

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  • Jeans and Shades

    Bathgate & WestLothian Highland Games 2009

  • Starbank Inn, Edinburgh

    The Starbank Inn is a very pleasant pub located in Newhaven, Edinburgh on the corner of Newhaven Road and Laverockbank Road with views over the Firth of Forth. Good selection of draught beers and malt whiskies.

  • Military Training

    Armed Forces Day, Edinburgh 2012

  • Regent Bridge, Waterloo Place

    The Regent Bridge is of great significance, both as an outstanding feat of civil engineering and as an important architectural element of the Waterloo Place scheme. The bridge, 50 feet high, was the first to span the deep ravine known as Low Calton, enabling the construction of a new access road from Princes Street to the east. The scheme as a whole forms the critical element of the vista up Princes Street towards Calton Hill and the east and creates an impressive entry to Princes Street from the east. The `triumphal arch' form of the screens is significant as they commemorate the Battle of Waterloo. Their Ionic colonnades also link stylistically to the classical facades of Waterloo Place. Regent Bridge is a major example of the Greek Revival work of Archibald Elliot, one of Edinburgh's leading architects in the early 19th century. On the screen to the North of Waterloo Place is an inscribed panel which reads, `COMMMENCED IN THE EVER MEMORABLE YEAR 1815. SIR JOHN MAJORIBANKS OF LEES, BARONET, M.P., LORD PROVOST OF THE CITY. ARCHIBALD ELLIOT, ARCHITECT'. Above, is `THE REGENTS BRIDGE' The screen to the South of Waterloo Place is inscribed with `OPENED AUGUST 18TH 1819 FOR THE ENTRY OF HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS PRINCE LEOPOLD OF SAXE COBURG'. A plan to form an access to Calton Hill from the east end of Princes Street had been suggested as early as 1790. However, at the time it was thought to be impractical due to the difficulties of gaining permission to disturb the Calton Burying Ground and the expense involved in acquiring and demolishing the properties which stood on the new route. By 1813, two major new developments made the new route a viable necessity. Firstly, in 1811-12, plans had begun to be formed for the construction of the New Town to the east, the centre piece of which was to be a development on the east side of Calton Hill. Secondly, in 1814, an Act was passed which designated the south slopes of Calton Hill as the location of the new national gaol. Access to Calton Hill at this time was circuitous and difficult. The Acts of 1813 and 1814 appointed commissioners to oversee the construction of the new bridge and road over the Low Calton ravine and instructed the acquisition of the necessary properties and the intersection of the Calton Burying Ground. In January 1815 Robert Stevenson was appointed as engineer for the scheme. By December 1815, Archibald Elliot's designs for the buildings and bridge had been chosen over those of Gillespie Graham and Crichton, and Elliot was appointed as architect for the scheme. Stevenson himself had submitted a report which stressed the desirability of retaining the spectacular views of the city and beyond which would be gained from the bridge. Elliot's final design accorded in part with Stevenson's views; the views to the north and south were retained through the use of an open colonnade above the bridge's principal span. The contract for the bridge was signed in the summer of 1816, and construction duly commenced. It was officially opened during the visit of Prince Leopold of Saxe Coburg in 1819.

  • James Braidwood (1800–1861)

    James Braidwood (1800–1861) founded the world's first municipal fire service in Edinburgh in 1824, and was the first director of the London Fire Engine Establishment (the brigade which was eventually to become the London Fire Brigade). He is credited with the development of the modern municipal fire service

  • Meat Market Arch

    The Meat Market Arch is the three entrance arches of the former Edinburgh Meat Market built in 1884, on a site on the corner of Semple Street in Fountainbridge, Edinburgh. There were slaughterhouses on the opposite side of Fountainbridge and and cattle markets at nearby area of Lauriston. The Meat Market moved to the Chesser in 1921. Much later the old building became the famous Fat Sam's restaurant and, for a time thereafter, a nightclub. However, despite its B-listing, the building was demolished in 2007 and the arch moved to a site just to the west and re-erected as work was completed on the site in 2009.

  • The Man with the Skinny Jeans

    Edinburgh Walkabout 2013

  • "Piss off, or I'll shove my hosepipe up yer ar….. ! "

    Young man threatens to perform douche treatments

  • Tourists in Edinburgh

    Royal Mile Edinburgh 2013

  • Just dropped in!

    Crieff Highland Gathering 2007

  • Superman !

    Crieff Highland Gathering 2007

  • Flying in !

    Crieff Highland Gathering 2007

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  • Athlete

    Crieff Highland Gathering 2007

  • Athletes

    Crieff Highland Gathering 2007

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  • Athletes

    Crieff Highland Gathering 2007

  • Bass Rock

    North Berwick, East Lothian - The Bass Rock, or simply The Bass, ( /ˈbæs/), is an island in the outer part of the Firth of Forth in the east of Scotland. It is approximately 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) offshore, and 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) north-east of North Berwick. It is a steep-sided volcanic rock, 107 metres (351 ft) at its highest point, and is home to a large colony of gannets. The rock is currently uninhabited, but historically has been settled by an early Christian hermit, and later was the site of an important castle, which was, after the Commonwealth, used as a prison. The island was in the ownership of the Lauder family for almost six centuries, and now belongs to Sir Hew Fleetwood Hamilton-Dalrymple. A lighthouse was constructed on the rock in 1902, and the remains of a chapel are located there. The Bass Rock features in numerous works of fiction, including Robert Stevenson's Catriona and The Lion is Rampant by contemporary Scottish novelist Ross Laidlaw.

  • Tug O' War

    Crieff Highland Gathering 2007

  • Tug O' War Participant

    Crieff Highland Gathering 2007

  • Tug O' War

    Crieff Highland Gathering 2007

  • Piper

    Crieff Highland Gathering 2007

  • Drummer

    Crieff Highland Gathering 2007

  • Italian Spectators

    Italian spectators watch street performer, in High Street, Edinburgh


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