Richard Findlay's Gallery of Photographs with a Scottish Twist
Welcome to FotoFling Scotland's Gallery
Fotos with a Scottish Twist

Edinburgh Castle from Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh


Welcome to FotoFling Scotland and share Richard Findlay's passion for photography featuring Scotland’s people, mountains, lochs and glens, and events with a Scottish flavour.


Click on the various folders of galleries or search a keyword to view images and click further to enlarge or use slideshow facility


Many photos maybe purchased/licensed and Richard is also available for commissions - paid or without fee depending on the nature of the project - about me


Fotos with a Scottish Twist




Featured Photo Galleries

What's New ?

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rehearsal of new work by David Hughes 'Drei Seelen' - David Hughes Dance Autum Tour 2014 (Kirsty Pollock and Thomas Baylis)

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rehearsals for Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame'

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rehearsals for Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame'

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rehearsals for Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame'

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rehearsals for Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame'

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rehearsals for Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame'

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rehearsals for Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame'

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rehearsals for Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame'

  • Martin Lindinger & Gwen Berwick

    Rehearsals for Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame'

  • Martin Lindinger & Thomas Baylis

    Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame' with Martin Lindinger, Gwen Berwick and Thomas Baylis

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame' with Martin Lindinger, Gwen Berwick and Thomas Baylis

  • Gwen Berwick and Kirsty Pollock

    Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame' with Martin Lindinger, Gwen Berwick and Thomas Baylis

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame' with Martin Lindinger, Gwen Berwick and Thomas Baylis

  • Kilt Meyhem

    Stylised shot of David Hughes Dance Scotland work 'Drei Seelen'

  • Rehearsal David Hughes' new work ’Drei Seelen' (Three Souls)

    Anwar Russell, Alan Lambie, Thomas Baylis,

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame'

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame'

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rafael Bonachela's '4:Freeze-Frame'

  • Anwar Russell

    Rehearsal of new work by David Hughes 'Drei Seelen' - David Hughes Dance Autum Tour 2014

  •  

    Rehearsal of Rafael Bonachela’s ’4:Freeze-Frame’ (Thomas Baylis & Martin Lindinger)

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rehearsal of Rafael Bonachela’s ’4:Freeze-Frame’ (Thomas Baylis, Martin Lindinger & Gwen Berwick )

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rehearsal of new work by David Hughes 'Drei Seelen' - David Hughes Dance Autum Tour 2014

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Alan Lambie in Rehearsal - Autum Tour 2014

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Thomas Baylis & Lucy Ireland in Rehearsal of new work by David Hughes 'Drei Seelen' - David Hughes Dance Autum Tour 2014

  • David Hughes Dance Scotland

    Rehearsal of Rafael Bonachela’s ’4:Freeze-Frame’ (Gwen Berwick & Martin Lindinger)

  • Martin Lindinger & Thomas Baylis

    Rehearsal - Autum Tour 2014

  • Martin Lindinger & Thomas Baylis

    Rehearsal - Autum Tour 2014

  • Top Hat

    Festival Theatre, Edinbugh

  • Fortingall Yew

    The Fortingall Yew is an ancient European yew (Taxus baccata) in the churchyard of the village of Fortingall in Perthshire, Scotland. Modern expert estimates have put its age at between 1,500 and 3,000 years. It may be the oldest tree in Britain. The yew's once massive trunk (16 metres, or 52 feet in girth when it was first taken notice of in writing, in 1769[8]) with a former head of unknown original height, is split into several separate stems, giving the impression of several smaller trees, with loss of the heartwood rings that would establish its true age.[9] This is a result of the natural decay of the ancient heartwood, which reduced the centre of the trunk down to ground level by 1770. Other than this the tree is still in good health and may last for many more centuries. By 1833 it was noted that "large arms had been removed and even masses of the trunk, carried off, to make drinking-cups and other curiosities. It is protected by a low wall erected in 1785 to preserve it but it can still be easily viewed. The yew is male. Clippings from the tree are to be taken to the Royal Botanic Gardens in Edinburgh to form part of a mile long hedge. The purpose of this "Yew Conservation Hedge Project" is to maintain the DNA of Taxus baccata from ancient specimens in the UK as, worldwide, the trees are threatened by felling and disease

  • Birks Cinema, Aberfeldy

    The Birks Cinema, built in the very heart of the town in 1939 in a late Art Deco style, closed in the early 1980s for lack of business. It then turned into an amusement hall, for which purpose the entire interior was demolished. The amusement hall closed in 2004 and the building stood as an empty shell for several years. In 2009 it was bought by the "Friends of the Birks"[7] with a grant from the Scottish Government’s Town Centre Regeneration Fund with plans to refurbish and reopen as a new 92-seat cinema and café-bar. The Friends are now a formal company limited by guarantee and registered as a charity, with Charlotte Flower heading up a board of trustees. In spring 2011, the Birks project was awarded £658,520 by the Scotland Rural Development Programme - half the sum needed to carry out the building work. Match funding for the SRDP grant has now been raised - notably through a Big Lottery grant of £539,950 announced on Feb 9 2012. Building work began in April 2012 and opened in Spring 2013

  • Friarton Bridge & Perth

    The Friarton Bridge is a lightweight concrete road bridge across the Firth of Tay on the southeastern outskirts of Perth, Scotland, approximately 20 miles upstream of the Tay Road Bridge. The bridge was constructed by the Miller Group and engineered by Andrew Stevenson, and is the first light weight concrete bridge built in Europe, and forms part of the eastern spur of the M90 between junctions 10 (Craigend) and 11 (Broxden), the most northerly motorway junction in the UK. It also forms part of the important east coast road corridor from Edinburgh through to Dundee and Aberdeen. It is the single largest structure on the M90, a title it will hold until the completion of the second Forth Road Bridge in 2016.

  • Friarton Bridge

    The Friarton Bridge is a lightweight concrete road bridge across the Firth of Tay on the southeastern outskirts of Perth, Scotland, approximately 20 miles upstream of the Tay Road Bridge. The bridge was constructed by the Miller Group and engineered by Andrew Stevenson, and is the first light weight concrete bridge built in Europe, and forms part of the eastern spur of the M90 between junctions 10 (Craigend) and 11 (Broxden), the most northerly motorway junction in the UK. It also forms part of the important east coast road corridor from Edinburgh through to Dundee and Aberdeen. It is the single largest structure on the M90, a title it will hold until the completion of the second Forth Road Bridge in 2016.

  • Elcho Castle

    Elcho Castle is located a short distance above the south bank of the River Tay approximately four miles south-east of Perth, Scotland. It consists of a Z-plan tower house, with fragments of a surrounding wall with corner towers. The Castle was built on the site of an older structure about 1560, and is one of the best surviving examples of its date in Scotland.


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